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Thread: North Queensland adventure Part 2

  1. #1

    North Queensland adventure Part 2

    Day Two – Adventure into the great unknown

    After our highs of day one catching a new species on ISO, we went to sleep early in anticipation of the adventures ahead.
    The sleep was restless for all of us to say the least. We went to sleep around 7-8pm as we were so tired, but due to going to bed so early, Timmy and I both woke around 11pm. I quietly tried to go to the toilet, but I must have managed to wake Vish slightly.
    He whispered to me…’hey Scott, there’s someone in the room. I think it’s the neighbour..’ LOL
    We told him to go back to sleep. Hahaha.

    We woke bright and early to a breakfast of fried eggs and a middle eastern bread dish prepared by Timmy. It was a great start to the day.
    Packing the pre-rigged rods was a task in itself. 4 spins sticks, 2 jigging rods, 3 popping rods + hundreds of lures. We had the gear, but no idea what we were doing.
    We made our way down to the marina and picked up our 5.2m sports cruiser. It was a great boat for the type of fishing we were wanting to do. It was open at the bow with a side console and a rear deck perfect for a group of 3.
    Questions were asked at the marina about potential spots and we made sure we were going to be away from the green marine exclusion zones.

    The main target species for the trip was GT. I had hooked 4 or so fish on my last trip here, but failed to land any on pe4 braid and 60lb leader.
    Other target species were. Coral Trout, Longtail Tuna, Spanish Mackrel and other tasty reef species.

    Captain Timmy, took control of the boat. Vish and I fell in love with the scenery and did a Titanic scene on the bow. I will cherish the moment forever. Love you Vish.

    The first spot we fished was a narrow passage between two small islands. It had quite strong water movement on the incoming and outgoing tides. Width was probably 300mm between islands at the narrowest point. So, water movement here was strong. If you fell in, it would be very dangerous.

    We probably made about 50 or so casts between the 3 of us but we failed to see anything resembling a fish. We opted to move to the next spot. But whilst moving, we spotted some tuna working some bait. We tried to cast to the fish, but they were quite sporadic and not working with any birds. After a frustrating 30 mins of chasing the tuna, we gave up and headed for a far reef. It would have been a total of 45mins from the marina at 30knots. Quite a fair distance.

    When we got to the next spot, it was a very low series of reefs which were just exposed on the rising tide coming up from about 20m of water depth. We tried another 50 or so casts to the reef in search of GT’s but nothing to be seen. We were on a roll…damn it!!
    We then spotted some surface activity with a few birds working about 100m away from the reef. We saw a few silver flashes in amongst the bait. Timmy and I grabbed our light spin sticks with small hardbodies and metals, whilst Vish opted to put out a bait on a sabiki rig..lol

    Timmy and I quickly caught a few fish which we didn’t kow the species, but they were around 60-70cm in length and looked like a massive yakka. These went back in the drink to live another day.
    Vish was onto something decent on the sabiki. He took it easy on the fish, as the light sabiki rig wasn’t designed for such a large fish. It took him a while to bring in. It turned out to be a Spanish mac!! Around the 80cm mark.
    Superb fishing skills by sifu Vish. High fives all around.

    However, Vish soon fell victim to the dreaded motion sickness. We had to drop him off on a deserted island in the middle of nowhere to recover. The island was something that can’t be described in words. Simply breathtaking is all I can say.
    Being the pro, Vish took his popping rod and tackle for a fish off the rocks. He mentioned to us that he had a few knocks on the large GT popper by some Spanish Macks whilst they were being chased by some Sharks. The area was alive with fish. However, no hook-ups.

    During the time that Vish was on the island, Timmy and I spun a bit more just off the reef for some Spanish Macks up to 80cm. Most were thrown back, as we had enough fish.

    The tide reached its peak, the water stopped moving and so did the action. We remembered that we left Vish on an island and went back to pick him up. On the way, we explored the other side of the island. It was spectacular. Sheer cliffs of about 50m falling straight into 30m of water. Looking at the sounder, showed no bait or any big fish at the base of the cliff, so I decided to have a swim off the boat in 30m of water. In hindsight, probably not the smartest thing to do, considering that the waters are infested with sharks and crocs.

    Picking up Vish from the island, we decided to cut up some of the garfish we had caught the day before and fish a light floating rig similar to the aussie wash fishing technique. This basically consisted of a light ball sinker free running on the leader straight to a 4/0 circle hook. Timmy pulled up the target species in a matter of minutes. A coral trout. However, he was a little small at around 15cm. lol
    But then soon after, I had a decent bite on the bait and pulled up his bigger brother. An amazing looking Coral Trout of around 45cm. Another goal achieved!!
    We also pulled in a couple of decent sweetlips and timmy caught a very nice maori wrasse which we let go as they are a protected species.

    We now had about 3 hrs to return the boat, so the decision was made to chase our main target of GT again from the shallow reefs we saw on the way out.
    We hit the shallow reefs up against the little islands with big poppers and stickbaits. Probably having another 100 casts between the 3 of us. I had a follow on my stickbait by a GT but that was it for the day.

    Getting tired of casting heavy lures with heavy setups in the hot sun, we decided to hit an inlet on the way back to the Marina with some bait.
    We forgot we had bought a massive lump of dog food for burley, so that went into the water in pieces over the next hour or so. We had a few enquiries but nothing notable for the first 30 mins. Timmy then had a big run on the light spin stick. It took him all over the boat but broke him off on the light leader. He were devastated. I told him it was probably a GT to make him feel worse..lol

    I soon had a similar hit and battled it out with the fish for well over 10 mins on my light spin stick. The fish was powerful and used the current to its advantage. Calls were made for a GT or Golden Trevally again. We soon saw colour and up came a bloody reef shark of well over a metre. Timmy lightly gaffed the fish in the mouth so that we could get the hook out and take some photos, but the shark shook its way to freedom before we could get any photos, but we did get the shark on the Gopro. I’m certain Timmy did it intentionally to get back at me for teasing him prior.
    Timmy soon had another good fish on the line. This one swam differently, and we couldn’t work it out. But after a few tense minutes, we saw colour. Vish thought it looked like a big Spanish Mackrel but I thought it looked like a large Golden Trevally. But we will never know, as it soon broke him off again.

    The tide dropped and the action soon died down. We made our way back to the marina and were greeted with ‘Wooos’ and ‘Ahhhhs’ from people at the marina when they saw our bucket of fish.
    Timmy really worked the boat like a pro. It wouldn’t have been easy in the new area with totally different conditions to what he would have been used to. A good captain always gets his crew onto fish.

    We got back to our apartment and cooked up some microwave noodles, takeaway fried rice, cooked Spanish mackerel and Coral Trout sashimi. What more can you ask??
    We didn’t get our GT, but there was always tomorrow.

    Vish also had a bout of sleep walking, fishing the fish in his sleep. Haha
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    day 2 h.jpg
    missed one photo of a sweetlip

  3. #3
    Some more photos

    Sent from my EVA-L09 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by autocad View Post
    Some more photos

    Sent from my EVA-L09 using Tapatalk
    Captain Tim looks High

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    What a trip. What did the coral trout sashimi taste like? That has always been near the top of the list of fish to try as sashimi.

    That island where Vish was dropped off looks absolute pristine.

    ISO Fishing Lifestyle Team


    Homepage: http://isofishinglifestyle.com.au/
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  6. #6
    very nice trip lads!

    looks like scorpion fish sashimi, drooling

  7. #7
    Nice trout and redthroat, guys. Good to hear you got a spaniard too. They're delicious. Cool to see a baby Napoleon - they're such cute creatures. The 'yakkas' are finny scad. GTs don't mind eating them.

    Your GT fishing experience is really not unusual. They're an animal that just requires lots of hard work (even to get a bite). Some days they're super aggressive and everywhere. Other times things look perfect, and you'll cast for a whole day without seeing one. It happens - a bit like kingfish in that sense. As a general rule, current is great, but current and bait are better. You'll often find the bait concentrates on a particular side of a bommie. The locals call these 'pressure points'. GT's also seem to have a preference for fusiliers, which are shaped a little like a yakka, but are brightly coloured (usually blue body and yellow tails). These usually make themselves conspicuous by feeding near the surface just off the reef shelves.

    Looks like you guys had some fun that day.

    Owen

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Piscineidiot View Post
    Nice trout and redthroat, guys. Good to hear you got a spaniard too. They're delicious. Cool to see a baby Napoleon - they're such cute creatures. The 'yakkas' are finny scad. GTs don't mind eating them.

    Your GT fishing experience is really not unusual. They're an animal that just requires lots of hard work (even to get a bite). Some days they're super aggressive and everywhere. Other times things look perfect, and you'll cast for a whole day without seeing one. It happens - a bit like kingfish in that sense. As a general rule, current is great, but current and bait are better. You'll often find the bait concentrates on a particular side of a bommie. The locals call these 'pressure points'. GT's also seem to have a preference for fusiliers, which are shaped a little like a yakka, but are brightly coloured (usually blue body and yellow tails). These usually make themselves conspicuous by feeding near the surface just off the reef shelves.

    Looks like you guys had some fun that day.

    Owen
    Thanks Owen for the infos...we are coming back for sure

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Team.IFL.Jay View Post
    What a trip. What did the coral trout sashimi taste like? That has always been near the top of the list of fish to try as sashimi.

    That island where Vish was dropped off looks absolute pristine.
    The coral trout sashimi was one of our targets foe the trip. We were so excited see a legal one. The taste was different to a scorpion fish. It actually tasted closer to lobster than the scorpion. I would say it is even better than lobster sashimi. It was firmer.

    Sent from my EVA-L09 using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by meiji View Post
    very nice trip lads!

    looks like scorpion fish sashimi, drooling
    Thanks ryan. We need to catch the GT on our next trip

    Sent from my EVA-L09 using Tapatalk

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